Leaving The Nest

Discussion in 'Open Discussion' started by davriver209, Jul 8, 2018.

  1. davriver209

    davriver209 - Rookie -

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    so I’m 27, I’m getting married and I have a daughter...

    We’ve been talking, a lot. And one topic that is scary but excites me is taking off from our hometown and starting a new somewhere else.

    We were thinking about taking off from California and going to Oregon... has anyone done this? Can you share your expierences? Bad and good... I’m a bit scared cause I’m close to my family but my wife isn’t close to hers... though I’m sure a move would make her really happy. Looking for thoughts, advice and expierences
     
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  2. JohnnyComeLately2k6

    JohnnyComeLately2k6 - Rookie -

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    I have colleagues working in Oregon, and one person said real estate is cheaper there as compared to California.

    From my experience, the independence should be good for you folks. Just have each others' backs because it's you three vs. the world.

    Good luck!
     
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  3. gcclaker

    gcclaker Moderator Staff Member

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    Change is always good... Just take care of all business you have now and nothing follows you.
     
  4. Jaguar

    Jaguar - Lakers 6th Man -

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    Research the state economy and neighborhoods before you commit. There is a population migration to Oregon, so if you want to know where Oregon is headed, look at Denver; and if you want to know how Denver got to where it is today look at California. Oregon will change in due time and it’s best to be ahead of the game.
     
  5. davriver209

    davriver209 - Rookie -

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    I really appreciate the response, but that’s a generic statement. What exactly would I be looking for? The trends? I know people are leaving in flocks to other states, but I’m not sure what I’d be specifically looking for?
     
  6. therealdeal

    therealdeal Moderator Staff Member

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    The best schools, where people are going and why (which city and why that city), the types of people populating those areas (old, young, single family, ethnicities if that's important to you), what types of jobs are likely to be there when you get there.

    Most important thing for me is don't buy a house before you know the neighborhood really well. It's easy to get blown away by a nice looking house at a good price, but if it's surrounded by meth dealers, it's going to never appreciate in value. Buy a worse house in a great neighborhood and spend that time building that house up so that it really appreciates in value by the time you want to either sell it or rent it or whatever the case may be.
     
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  7. Jaguar

    Jaguar - Lakers 6th Man -

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    I kept it generic because what you research and look for depends on your situation and you as an individual. In that regard there are too many variables to account for me to be specific. I don’t know your situation to be more specific.

    But I will try to frame my comment by saying your research into the state economy has to do with knowing what the predominate industries are for that state and where do you fit in, do you fit in, or does it not matter for what you and your family do for a living. Maybe you are doing a work transfer and employment is not an issue. For whatever you do, what is the job market like and do you have a backup plan if for some reason your job were to no longer be available to you. If you were single and childless then you can wing it, but with a new wife and child, you have to have a backup plan.

    For neighborhoods, this would apply even if you were only moving within California. But make sure you know the type of neighborhood you are moving into. What are the neighbors like, the quality of schools for your child, etc. Google Earth it to get a view even. Are you renting or buying. Is it gentrifying, which effects whether you should rent or buy. Etc.

    Having lived in a few locations in this country, the overall theme is can you survive where you are moving to. And your survival depends on employment, cost of living, and quality of life. As best you can, look into those types of areas using the internet and any contacts you have in the state. If you can fly out and visit for a weekend then even better. The internet wasn’t available to me when I had to do the research, so you have a good tool in it.
     
  8. therealdeal

    therealdeal Moderator Staff Member

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    I'd definitely recommend hanging out in those areas for a while before buying. Go get a coffee or something and just go hang out in a park near your house, drive the neighborhood, see if you can talk to some neighbors even.

    Buying a house without knowing the neighborhood is a huge mistake.
     
  9. Barnstable

    Barnstable Supreme Fuzzler of Lakersball.com Staff Member

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    I’ve moved around a lot over my adult life. Jamaica, Canada, Seattle, New York, Connecticut, Denver, and a few more.

    A few thoughts are, it’s really helpful to have relatives nearby for helping out with kids. Babysitting, emergencies, and just general breaks from them is vital. Not sure that applies to your relatives, but if it does, consider the impact of not having relatives around before moving. Baby sitters aren’t always an adequate replacement.

    Second, it takes a while to settle in. New job, finding new friends, buying furniture, discovering the area, etc makes it take a while to feel settled, so be ready for feeling unsettled for about a year at least in my experience.

    Aside from the specifics or economics, research the vibe of a city. Look for comparisons to cities you know and like. Is it really fast paced, or slow and easy? Are people friendly or do they go about their business and stay to themselves. The most extreme examples would be New York compared to anywhere else pretty much, but if for instance you didn’t like fast paced life, you’d hate New York. If you hated hippy vibes and liberal laws, you’d hate Boulder Colorado lol.
     
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  10. sirronstuff

    sirronstuff LB Facebook Editor

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    I relocated from CA to TX. thought it would be a better place to raise kids, and economic reasons.

    Financial things often change, and depending on the type of work, jobs in big cities often pay more due to cost of living. (things to consider)

    The social requirements of women are usually more than men, so it's important to find a way to get plugged in so you both have that. One great way to meet people in a new place is a home church. (Also has babysitters like mentioned above) Or other like minded places with people of similar interests. Some areas are less open to newcomers than you might think. SoCal is a big melting pot, but not so in the rest of the country "as much"

    Since I was in sales, I learned quickly not to mention while I was in Fort Worth that I was from CA. (As one customer said, the "land of fruits and nuts") In Dallas, a one hour drive away, it didn't matter.

    Either way, a big move like that needs to be prayerfully considered, seek wise counsel, and take a road trip. It's a LIFE changing decision. The kids your daughter and any future children will grow up around will be flat out different. That can be both good and bad, or just plain different.

    On a completely different note, and unrelated, if there are things in life we try to run from to make changes, a change of scenery or geography doesn't help if we take it with us. I personally thought I would fall into a more reasonable pace of life upon my arrival in TX. Instead, I brought my CA pace of life with me to my detriment.
     
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2018
  11. davriver209

    davriver209 - Rookie -

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    Thank you for all the responses. Yeah I completely get that it’s a huge decision and not a simple one to make. We’re obvciously talking maybe a year or two down the road, but it’s def been brought up in conversation...

    Oregon is still a place we’re heavily considering but Texas might be a close 2nd.... I’m a cop, so my transition shouldn’t be that bad, they’re in demand everywhere...
     
  12. TIME

    TIME Moderator Staff Member

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    As a Cop, you might want to consider how the Police are viewed in your area of choice. In Texas for the most part the profession is respected. In small town Oregon that tends to be the case as well. Portland, not so much.
     
  13. Battle Tested20

    Battle Tested20 - Lakers All Star -

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    Great point
     
  14. davriver209

    davriver209 - Rookie -

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    So I really appreciate everyone’s response. I just got a call from Santa Clara pd... they pay 125k starting... I just applied, but I did have a question... anyone here know about the tax rates? I know the overall pay is significantly higher, but that also means we get taxed heavier. Does anyone know how hard you’d get boned getting paid 10-12k a month?
     
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  15. sirronstuff

    sirronstuff LB Facebook Editor

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    I would do a quick search for CA income tax brackets. In that range it’s not a bad idea to have a part time business for tax purposes and write offs.

    I would declare more deductions to net higher pay on your check, then losses can be absorbed by the business. You can lose money on a business for 5 years before it’s considered a hobby.

    Home offices can be expensive

    :Brows:

    If you get into the website business, I know a guy who might be selling www.ihatelebron.com
     
  16. Jaguar

    Jaguar - Lakers 6th Man -

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    I like where this is going. The ice is melting fast...
     
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  17. sirronstuff

    sirronstuff LB Facebook Editor

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  18. Jaguar

    Jaguar - Lakers 6th Man -

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    Just look up federal and CA tax rates and plug in your salary, or is there something more to your question. I’ll tell you now you will pay in California regardless. The question is can you find a reasonable place to live there because Santa Clara is a nice area. As Sirron said, deductions are your friend.
     
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  19. davriver209

    davriver209 - Rookie -

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    So right now I’m shopping jobs in the bay. I love the agency I work for, but our next contract is not looking good, they don’t wanna give us any kind of raise. My loyalty can only go so far. Right now I’m in the process with Santa Clara, San Jose and Milpitas.

    Does anyone have expierence living in the Bay Area? San Jose looks like my happy medium on what I want from police agencies. I’m actually almost done with them, and if I start, with all my add on pay and education incentive, I’ll be starting at 108k, minus all the overtime I’ll get and what not. And in three years I’ll top out at 154k base pay. My question to you guys, is it possible to live in the Bay Area with that salary? My wife is pregnant with our 2nd, but she will be working as well.

    I hear conflicting things. I won’t be comfortable over there, then others I hear you downsize your life would be fine and at least 100k you’ll be fine etc.. I’ve never lived there, my wife has, but she was working two jobs and renting a room for 800 bucks.
     

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